1 Zujinn

Breakfast Club Analysis Essay

Fundamental Attribution Error: It’s the Situation, Not the Person

This video further explains the Fundamental Attribution Error which is seen in the way Bender is treated in the movie. As shown in this video, people often forget how much our situations and environment affect our behavior. Like the situation with the driver, we tend to assume that people’s behavior is solely based on their personality, and this is not always the case. In the situation with the driver, someone cut him off and he immediately assumed the other driver was a jerk instead of considering the outside circumstances that caused them to behave the way they did.

http://www.fastcompany.com/1657515/fundamental-attribution-error-its-situation-not-person

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

The article below shows a practical way of applying Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs to a management position. In the movie, Principal Vernon, who is in a management position, could have better handled the detention situation if he had considered the individual needs of the troubled students. For example, Principal Vernon could have reached out to Allison and helped her meet her severe need to belong by suggesting clubs or activities she could join. This would have satisfied her need to belong and helped her move up on the hierarchy.

http://www.netmba.com/mgmt/ob/motivation/maslow/

Reciprocal Determinism: The Bobo Doll Experiment

The Bobo Doll Experiment video below shows that when we see people do something we usually imitate their actions and behavior. This shows that we learn by observing people in our environment. Reciprocal determinism is the idea that behavior is controlled by the individual, through their thought processes, and by the environment, through certain stimulating events. In the Bobo Doll Experiment, children who observed adults being aggressive toward the Bobo Doll in turn acted violently towards the doll as well. In the movie, we see this played out with Bender’s character. At home, Bender witnesses his father verbally abusing his mother and is also a victim of the verbal abuse. Because Bender is constantly exposed to verbal abuse, he has a proclivity for verbally abusing others.

Frustration-aggression Principle: Alcohol’s Affect

In the movie, we see the frustration-aggression principle with Andrew when Bender pulls a knife. The knife acts as an aggression cue. Alcohol tends to affect one’s emotions and impairs one’s judgement, which can amplify the aggression cue.  The article below says that alcohol “may increase the likelihood of a frustrated person focusing on one small aspect of the situation, exaggerating its importance, and responding in an irrational, aggressive manner.”  Theoretically, if Andrew were under the influence of alcohol his reaction to the knife would have been much worse and he might’ve acted irrationally.

http://www.sirc.org/publik/alcohol_and_violence_4.html

Stereotypes In the Media

Stereotypes in the media is a controversial subject. To some this is highly offensive and must be stopped, while others think it is simply funny and do not consider it offensive at all. The article below gives numerous examples of movies and television shows that can potentially create a barrier between the races. For example, the show Outsourced shows stereotyping in the work place by stereotyping all Indian people as being technologically savvy. The movie The Breakfast Club  shows stereotyping in the high school setting. Each student is stereotyped from the beginning and gain nicknames based on their stereotype.

http://asiasociety.org/blog/asia/are-stereotypes-media-funny-or-just-distasteful

Peer Pressure Kills

Peer pressure is often seen among adolescents. In the newspaper article below, we see that many teenagers have made decisions based on peer pressure that have cost them their lives. Teens tend to value their peers opinion far more than their parents and for some their peers opinions pose dangers to them. All of the students in the movie, are influenced by peer pressure to partake in smoking Marijuana. If the students weren’t confined to the school building, the smoking could have gotten out of hand and led to disastrous consequences like the teenagers mentioned in the article.

http://articles.chicagotribune.com/1997-06-19/news/9706190074_1_peer-pressure-alcohol-end-of-the-school-year

Psychology Analysis Of The Breakfast Club

Oh what can you really learn in Saturday detention. The Breakfast Club film contained a wide variety of behavior and stereotypes. Each person had there on personality and taste at the beginning of the film. I believe that communication played the biggest part in the movie. It shows the way that people from totally different backgrounds can communicate and even agree on issues. The various types of communication and behaviors within the film will be discussed.

To begin with the film started out with a communication climate that was both tense and without verbal communication. This was mainly due to the variance in membership constructs of the characters involved. The characters included the brain Brian, Andrew the athlete, the criminal Bender, the princess Claire, and the basket case Allison. There was a great deal of interesting nonverbal communication taking place between these people. Their reactions and responses to each other demonstrated perceptual errors, which would be shown as the story progressed.

The gender conflict styles also played a role. The girls both tended to listen, rather than hold the attention of the others. This was especially true in Allison's case, whom never spoke. Allison was introduced in the movie as the basket case. Allison showed that she was obviously insecure, seating herself facing away from the rest of the room. She would not speak out. She was non-assertive, when asked what she wanted she would not respond. She would only sit and smile to her self. She didn't like herself, or others. She was both unsuccessful and helpless. The only way she displayed her anger was by giving a whimper. She obviously had a lot of pent up feeling, for she reveals a lot later in the movie through self-disclosure. Allison obviously lacked the respect of others, for she had no friends whatsoever earlier to her time spent in this detention. She also was nervous and showed this by chewing her nails and playing with her hair.

Brian was another case of insecurity. The influence of self-concept was strong with Brian Johnson for he had no sense of self. He could not meet the standards of his desired self and was therefore unhappy with himself as a person. Any suggestion Brian made throughout the movie was met by resistant responses, or interruptions.

Claire was the "Prom Princess", she had a high self esteem, and was assertive. As well she was highly emotional throughout the film. An example of her emotional language was her straightforward statement to Bender "I hate you" This was after he had broken a promise not to laugh at her. She made up...

Loading: Checking Spelling

0%

Read more

The breakfast club Essay

830 words - 3 pages The breakfast club was to say the least a boring 80's movie. But it was a good movie for the purpose of analysis. Simply put, it will not be on my list of movies to rent next time that I am at the rental store. I chose to explain the points of view of Andrew, the jock, and Allison the loner/quite person. I will also be making use of the key terms Clique Groups, and...

Film: The Breakfast Club Essay

1264 words - 5 pages The movie The Breakfast Club was released in 1985, and is based on a group of five high school students from stereotypical cliques; the popular, jock, nerd and the outcasts, who all wind up stuck together for Saturday detention. Throughout the movie many themes present themselves such as teenage rebellion, peer pressure and family issues as the students get to know each other. The most prominent theme throughout the movie is the student’s...

The Breakfast Club

1582 words - 6 pages The Breakfast Club contained a wide variety of communication. Within this essay, the various types of communication and behaviors will be discussed. Key terms will be pointed out and highlighted, as well as described in relation to the examples extracted from the film. The character's included: Brian (brain), Andrew (athlete), John Bender (criminal), Claire...

The Breakfast Club

1644 words - 7 pages The Breakfast Club The Breakfast Club is a movie about five totally different students in high school who are forced to spend a Saturday in detention in their school library. The students come from completely different social classes which make it very difficult for any of them to get along. They learn more about each other and their problems that each of them have at home and at school. This movie plays their different personality types...

The Breakfast Club and the 80's.

566 words - 2 pages Whenever I am about to go view a 1980's film or any older film, I always bring with me certain assumptions. These assumptions are usually wrong and the older film usually impresses me.Many popular movies of today are usually smothered with special effects and it's a common belief by many people that all these special effects make movies better. I can honestly say that I take that misconception with me as I start to watch older films,...

breakfast club vs perks of being a wallflower

1001 words - 4 pages Breakfast Club vs. Perks of Being a WallflowerCOMPARE THE WAY IN WHICH THE AUTHORS OF 2 TEXTS EXPLORE THE IMPORTANCE OF INDIVIDUAL IDENTITY.John Hughes'...

Social Cliques in The Breakfast Club by Eric Berne

735 words - 3 pages Social Cliques in The Breakfast Club by Eric Berne “Jock”, “prep”, “gangster”, “loser”, “geek”, “criminal”, “ popular”, are just a few labels of teenagers that are used everyday by outsiders who judge them without looking skin deep. In the matter of stereotyping, some may perceive it as being the base of an identity in the view of society. Eric Berne, an author and psychologist, wrote an article, “Can People Be Judged by Their Appearance?”,...

The 1980's Through the Eyes of John Hughes The Breakfast Club and Ferris Bueller's Day Off Historicism

1190 words - 5 pages The yuppie was in, nice cars were ideal, working hard was a necessity and a given, and nothing was more enjoyable than making money (except maybe spending it). Money and material were the trademarks of the 1980's, the decade of temporary prosperity. Adults bought huge houses, cruised vast oceans, and threw wild parties. Cocaine made its debut, and the divorce rate was at its highest. But what were the kids doing during all this insanity? To...

Analysis of the Themes in Fight Club

3339 words - 13 pages Analysis of the Themes in Fight Club It is easy to understand how and why many who view Fight Club (Fincher, 1999) would argue that is in essence a critique of post modern consumer culture within America or indeed the western world. After all we are faced with Character(s) Jack (Edward Norton) who seems to gain no cultural sustenance from the world in which he inhabits. More over it seems to do him harm in the form of...

Film Analysis of The Movie "Fight Club"

1155 words - 5 pages For years David Fincher has directed some of the most stylish and creative thrillers in American movies. His works include: Aliens 3, Seven, The Game and Fight Club. Each of these films has been not only pleasing and fun to watch but each has commented on society, making the viewers think outside the normal and analyze their world. Fight Club is no...

An Analysis of Vonnegut’s Breakfast of Champions

964 words - 4 pages An Analysis of Vonnegut’s Breakfast of Champions Kilgore Trout is a struggling novelist that can only get his novels published in porn magazines. Dwayne Hoover is a fabulously well-to-do car salesman that is on the brink of insanity. They only meet once in their lives, but the entire novel, Breakfast of Champions (1973), is based on this one meeting. The meeting is brief, but that is all the author, Kurt Vonnegut, needs to express his...

Leave a Comment

(0 Comments)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *